Bessie Stringfield

Bessie Stringfield
In the 1950s, when women were relegated to housework, either in marriage or as domestics, Stringfield was married several times and worked as a maid yet revved and roared through Florida’s palm-tree-lined streets on her Harley-Davidson, earning the unofficial title of “Motorcycle Queen of Miami.”

Her legend was big enough to warrant a posthumous induction into the Hall of Fame of the American Motorcyclist Association in 2002, nearly a decade after her 1993 death. Hundreds of women motorcyclists make an annual cross-country trek in her honor. She has been memorialized in a comic book and mentioned in a documentary and a book about women motorcyclists by Ann Ferrar, a friend who is also working on a memoir of her friendship with Stringfield.

A masterful storyteller, Stringfield amazed people with her accounts of being chased off the road as she traveled through the Jim Crow South; performing stunts on the Wall of Death at carnivals; and serving as a civilian motorcycle dispatch rider for the U.S. Army in the 1940s. Her childhood, in her telling, was Dickensian: born in Jamaica to an interracial couple; left motherless at a young age; abandoned by her father on a Boston street; and adopted by a benevolent Irish Catholic woman who treated her so well that she gave her a motorcycle when she was 16 years old.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/04/obit ... field.html
Indian train
1946 Dutch Road Assistance
Anonymous
 
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Bessie Stringfield


Tue Apr 10, 2018 8:31 am
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