Panhead Reliability

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64duo
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#16

Post by 64duo » Mon Jul 25, 2005 1:28 pm

Well some progress is made. Removing the carb allowed better access to the head bolts, surprisingly with rubber mallet & curved wrench, all needing snugging to what "feels" like 65lbs. The base nuts were also loose, I could easily get an 1/8 turn, BUT that nut behind the distributer, (in my case a mallory unit) is no go. I really dont want to pull the distributer, i'm not sure it will even clear the cylinder. One nut to go...... By the way, I don't really expect that my pan should act/behave like a new bike, it isn't new. It's had some miles. I just need the program installed, like on the movie the Matrix, in my head, to give me all the knowledge & skills I need, then a 15 minute shopping spree inside a Snap-on truck. Not much.
The pan is awesome, it'll start on the second kick cold once in a while, sometimes it starts after 30 kicks and a 10 minute break. It's part of that uncertainty that I don't like.
As for the linkert, perhaps I'll send my old carb off to Cotton for a rehab this winter. I love the look of that carb, and I'm already a little tired of the S&S sticking out so far, hits my knee.
Jonathan - 64FLH



Red55FL
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#17

Post by Red55FL » Tue Jul 26, 2005 3:41 am

64duo
Pulling the Mallory timer (can?t really call it a breaker as there is not a set of points in it) off is easy and it will clear the fins. Pull the timing plug and the spark plugs out. Hold a finger over the front plug hole and turn the engine over until you feel pressure coming out of the plug hole, this means that the front cylinder is on the compression stroke. Now watch for the timing mark to come up in the timing window as you continue to turn the engine. Stop when the timing mark is centered in the window. Next pull the top of the Mallory timer off by pulling the 3 screws (I think it was 3, but might only be 2 screws) out that run radialy around the circumference of the head. Use a Sharpie (permanent marker) to make an alignment mark on the shutter wheel and the housing so that when you reinstall the timer you will have a reference mark to get it reinstalled to the same point it was before you pulled it. Also use a scratch awl to make fine alignment marks on the base of the timer and the case before you loosen the hold down. Remove the hold down, remove the timer, tighten the cylinder base nut & reinstall the timer. Just align all of the marks and as long as you didn?t turn the engine while you were doing this, the engine will start and still be in time. You may have to pull the timer back out and turn the shaft a couple of times to get it right.
Even if I did it this way, I would still check the timing with a strobe type timing light. But if I didn?t have one handy, I still wouldn?t hesitate to pull the timer.

Red

62wild1
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Joined: Sun May 08, 2005 2:31 pm
Location: Grand Rapids, MI

#18

Post by 62wild1 » Thu Aug 18, 2005 3:38 pm

Jack, your sprocket info has me a wonderun. What do you recommend for a rear sprocket on a "62"

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#19

Post by Jack_Hester » Thu Aug 18, 2005 5:14 pm

62Wild -

If you are running a stock rear brake drum, I believe that you are limited to the OEM type 51T sprocket. In which case, you can play with the engine and tranny sprockets. If you are running a custom disc brake setup, with a seperate sprocket, then you are no longer limited. However, I would recommend a 49T as the smallest, with a stock engine. Anything smaller will put a lot of strain on your clutch plates. They will be the first to go South on you. My 76 FLH has a 49T on it, that I will leave on, when it finally gets back on the road. My Shovel is a basically stock 74 cu-in engine, with an Andrews 'A-grind' cam. The 49T rear was not too much for the bike, loaded with gear, and a passenger. But, I could tell that it was right on the edge of being loaded up.

Jack

rigidpanman
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#20

Post by rigidpanman » Thu Aug 18, 2005 6:46 pm

i have a rigid with the disc brake setup and i run a 22 tooth on the engine and a 24 on the trans and a 48 on the rear,it pulls good no problem there,but im still getting too much vibration.im going to investigate either a 23 tooth on the motor or a little less on the rear.

62wild1
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Location: Grand Rapids, MI

#21

Post by 62wild1 » Fri Aug 19, 2005 6:02 am

Thanks Jack, at the moment it has the following
24 eng, 37 clutch, 22 trans, 51 rear

Still putting it together so don't know how it runs with this setup so looking for advice. I'll try the 23 on the tranny as it needs a new sprocket anyway. I am looking for a 55 to 70 mph cruising range.

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#22

Post by mbskeam » Fri Aug 19, 2005 6:35 am

hello,
with a drum brake rear,
try a 24 on the tranny you will like this
I ran it at first like this:

23 engine
23 tranny
51 rear ......way to many rpms

then:24E,24T, 51R able to ride in 3rd what used to be 4th

then I went to belt drive, now: bdl 8mm belt, 25T and 51R

I would not go any bigger on tran as it is on the edge as jack posted.
I feel for the poor little guys(plates) when I get on it real hard

the reason I went to the 25T on tran was to try and get back to the 24,24, 51 combo it was nice at 55-70

mbskeam

62wild1
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Joined: Sun May 08, 2005 2:31 pm
Location: Grand Rapids, MI

#23

Post by 62wild1 » Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:45 pm

Thanks also Mbskeam. Maybe I'll try the 24 then on the tranny. Getting off subject a bit, I believe I received a test kit from you and haven't had a chance to thank you. Very nice package and thanks for the help.

62wild1
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Location: Grand Rapids, MI

#24

Post by 62wild1 » Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:52 pm

Sorry about the triple whammy! Guess thats what you get when you send from the big sand box........kept getting errors on send??

OneHandDuo
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Re:

#25

Post by OneHandDuo » Fri May 10, 2019 6:08 am

64duo wrote:
Sat Jul 23, 2005 5:43 pm
As you can imagine, not all pan owners have a legacy of motorcycling in the family, nor have a great story of how our lifes have been wrapped around harley's for our entire life.
64 DUO, thanks for what you said, I can so relate to it. This uncertainty and resolve to still do it.

I live in Europe and started my motorcycling carreer with an ex-police BMW as a student. I passed the driving test secretly and my mother was fuming when she found out. Shortly after my studies, I sold the bike to pay some debts. Stupid does as stupid goes.
Fast forward ten years, living in London, UK, first job. My best school buddy I had not seen in 15 years called. In the conversation, he said he had a bike to sell. Little did he know that I was looking for a commuter and weekedn fun bike. So I was the proud owner of a Suzuki GSX600F. Epic winter trip from Switzerland to the UK. Some roadtrips with my girlfriend (now wife) around the UK. Crash in London City center, Fleet street. Several attempts to resurect the bike failed. Sold it for scrap.
Fast forward 16 years. Married, three kids, dog, house, cars, job with a lot of pressure, but that I like.
The bug resurfaced. Bought an old BMW 75/5. Found out the Dutch seller had just stuck together pieces, nothing fits, nothing really works. Had it debugged by a BMW ex-factory racer that races regularly BMW from the 1920s and 30s. Tweeked it to look the way I liked it, but it lost a seat in the process.
Thinking of a big touring bike to travel with the wife once the kids are out of the house. In 8 to 10 years. Did a couple of outings with a friend who is bitten by the Harley bug. He took me to an open door day. Bug bit me as well.
Summer 2018: Holiday in the US. Rented a 2017 Road King for a couple of days. Bug bit again. Bad.
Still on holiday scoured the internet. Found a 64 DuoGlide 400 miles away from home in a neighbouring country (trust me, for Europe , that is REALLY far).
Did, what you should never do: went there without anybody why knows about bikes, bought on the spot and had it delivered.

Did not regret the deed, it is a lovely bike, but I have the same feeling as 64DUO: it is a hard thing to get into.
I know I will learn, but it is tough. I start to learn to drive with a foot clutch, several near-death experiences.
Realised the reserve does not work, thanks to the wife who came with the kids and a gallon of petrol to help me out. The car still smells of petrol, they took a leaky jerrycan.
The friend who brought me into the fold is no longer a friend (different story, but hey....)
The people that I see riding Harleys here seem very eager to fit into that Sons of Anarchy/Gangs/brotherhood mould that I cannot really relate to.

The local dealership does have 1 mechanic that works on older bikes. He seemed knowledgeable enough, but the rest of the shop was just staring at the bike, mumbling something about "lifestyle choices".
Called them, said it makes funny noises, the tuning sounds off. They tell me that is something for winter, they are too busy now. Right.

I have not found yet a mentor as 64 Duo describes, someone that leads a "normal" life like me, but knows his way around this sort of bike, but that will come.
I knew I would have to learn. And I am learning. And I love every minute of it. But it is tough. Exactly the kind of uphill struggle everybody talks about. You earn your Panhead, someone told me. I start to undertstand what he meant. I am on my way. Fingers crossed.

Next weekend the first bigger tour: 200 miles round trip to a local festival. Wish me luck ;-)

OneHandDuo
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Re:

#26

Post by OneHandDuo » Fri May 10, 2019 6:09 am

64duo wrote:
Sat Jul 23, 2005 5:43 pm
As you can imagine, not all pan owners have a legacy of motorcycling in the family, nor have a great story of how our lifes have been wrapped around harley's for our entire life.
64 DUO, thanks for what you said, I can so relate to it. This uncertainty and resolve to still do it.

I live in Europe and started my motorcycling carreer with an ex-police BMW as a student. I passed the driving test secretly and my mother was fuming when she found out. Shortly after my studies, I sold the bike to pay some debts. Stupid does as stupid goes.
Fast forward ten years, living in London, UK, first job. My best school buddy I had not seen in 15 years called. In the conversation, he said he had a bike to sell. Little did he know that I was looking for a commuter and weekedn fun bike. So I was the proud owner of a Suzuki GSX600F. Epic winter trip from Switzerland to the UK. Some roadtrips with my girlfriend (now wife) around the UK. Crash in London City center, Fleet street. Several attempts to resurect the bike failed. Sold it for scrap.
Fast forward 16 years. Married, three kids, dog, house, cars, job with a lot of pressure, but that I like.
The bug resurfaced. Bought an old BMW 75/5. Found out the Dutch seller had just stuck together pieces, nothing fits, nothing really works. Had it debugged by a BMW ex-factory racer that races regularly BMW from the 1920s and 30s. Tweeked it to look the way I liked it, but it lost a seat in the process.
Thinking of a big touring bike to travel with the wife once the kids are out of the house. In 8 to 10 years. Did a couple of outings with a friend who is bitten by the Harley bug. He took me to an open door day. Bug bit me as well.
Summer 2018: Holiday in the US. Rented a 2017 Road King for a couple of days. Bug bit again. Bad.
Still on holiday scoured the internet. Found a 64 DuoGlide 400 miles away from home in a neighbouring country (trust me, for Europe , that is REALLY far).
Did, what you should never do: went there without anybody why knows about bikes, bought on the spot and had it delivered.

Did not regret the deed, it is a lovely bike, but I have the same feeling as 64DUO: it is a hard thing to get into.
I know I will learn, but it is tough. I start to learn to drive with a foot clutch, several near-death experiences.
Realised the reserve does not work, thanks to the wife who came with the kids and a gallon of petrol to help me out. The car still smells of petrol, they took a leaky jerrycan.
The friend who brought me into the fold is no longer a friend (different story, but hey....)
The people that I see riding Harleys here seem very eager to fit into that Sons of Anarchy/Gangs/brotherhood mould that I cannot really relate to.

The local dealership does have 1 mechanic that works on older bikes. He seemed knowledgeable enough, but the rest of the shop was just staring at the bike, mumbling something about "lifestyle choices".
Called them, said it makes funny noises, the tuning sounds off. They tell me that is something for winter, they are too busy now. Right.

I have not found yet a mentor as 64 Duo describes, someone that leads a "normal" life like me, but knows his way around this sort of bike, but that will come.
I knew I would have to learn. And I am learning. And I love every minute of it. But it is tough. Exactly the kind of uphill struggle everybody talks about. You earn your Panhead, someone told me. I start to undertstand what he meant. I am on my way. Fingers crossed.

Next weekend the first bigger tour: 200 miles round trip to a local festival. Wish me luck ;-)

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