Getting rid of chrome

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SkyHogg
Posts: 25
Joined: Wed May 18, 2005 10:52 pm
Bikes: 64 Pan, 77 Sporty, 05 Electraglide
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Getting rid of chrome

#1

Post by SkyHogg » Sat Jun 25, 2005 7:29 am

I have an old outer primary that has rust pits, but I want to use it (it's the old smooth type, not the flat with a diamond). It had been chromed somewhere in its past, but I want to run it black. Same with a pair of old rims/spokes and oil tank that I have. Any suggestions on getting rid of the chrome so I can paint these parts? I've tried to blast it of with a home-grade sand blaster, but it just isn't cutting it (no pun intended). Would taking it to a commercial shop be worth it? I don't want to give it to someone that will spend a gazillion hours on it and charge me more than the bike is worth for the labor. Suggestions?



Cotten
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#2

Post by Cotten » Sat Jun 25, 2005 1:07 pm

Most industrial blasters would warp it.

Although it can be removed by reverse electrolysis, it much cheaper to just etch the surface enough for primer to stick. This can be done by hand, chemically, or with your home blaster if you keep the pressure low enough NOT to bubble the chrome (or else you will be sanding for hours.)

PS: You aren't really using "sand" are you? Harbor Freight has economical Russian aluminum oxide available that will cut chrome eventually.

SkyHogg
Posts: 25
Joined: Wed May 18, 2005 10:52 pm
Bikes: 64 Pan, 77 Sporty, 05 Electraglide
Location: N. Carolina

#3

Post by SkyHogg » Sat Jun 25, 2005 8:23 pm

No ... sand is for the beach! But seriously, since I already have some rust bubbles and pitting in the chrome the chemical process sounds like the way to go. The local auto jobber has a pit for cleaning gunk and paint, but I realize this will require something with a bit more power to it. What do you suggest?

Cotten
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#4

Post by Cotten » Sun Jun 26, 2005 12:34 am

Any way you look at it, chrome is evil.

Only you can make the decision as to how perfect of a finish you require: How much money or elbow grease you wish to expend.

On a primary,...I suggest a flexible sanding disc and a rattle can! It will get boogered soon enough anyway. (If you ride it, that is.)

VT

#5

Post by VT » Sun Jun 26, 2005 2:35 pm

Eastwood has self-etching primer and/or black over chrome paint. 8)

49flguy
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#6

Post by 49flguy » Sun Jun 26, 2005 2:56 pm

Skyhogg:

You can remove chrome plating easily and cheaply. Attach a piece of copper wire to the part you want to dechrome and attach the other end of the wire to a piece of copper pipe. Put part and pipe in a plastic container large enough that they can be immersed in water. Fill container until everything is submerged and hook up a battery charger with positive lead to the part and negative lead to the pipe. Add muriatic acid (used for cleaning masonry and available in jugs at most building supply stores) until you get about a 5 amp current flowing. The chrome will slowly fall off, but keep checking the process as the base metal will start eroding once the chrome is gone.

57pan
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#7

Post by 57pan » Mon Jun 27, 2005 5:29 pm

SkyHogg,

Here's another option to consider:

I had my chrome (aftermarket) inner/outer primary covers powdercoated and they turned out very well. The coater does sand blast them to etch the surface before sending the parts thru a high temp. burnoff oven that removes any and all traces of old paint, oil, grease etc. Then he powdercoats and bakes them.

I had the primary covers and the skid plate coated for $75.

Cotten
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#8

Post by Cotten » Tue Jun 28, 2005 12:15 am

Just a friendly warning:

I suffered some substantial losses due to P4gas destroying seasoned powdercoating. IN MINUTES. Nah, make that heatbeats.

(Flatties have the carb on the left, and drool easily.)

It is a lot easier AND CHEAPER to repair rattlecan paint!

Powdercoating is a one-way trip: Out of your wallet!

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