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Jack_Hester
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Panhead Reliability

#1

Post by Jack_Hester » Thu Jul 21, 2005 1:02 am

I just read through the 'Where have all the Panheads gone' and the 'How do I go faster' topics. I felt like replying to each, but decided to just create another topic.

I have a '59 FLH, mostly stock (no bags or windshield), sitting in my shop. Oil is bleading out in a drip pan, because of it sitting for almost two years. Check valve just won't hold but so long. It looks rough, with a few dents that it had when I purchased it a little over 3 decades ago. I parked it, because the back tire wouldn't pass inspection. Bought a new tire to cure that. Haven't been able to attempt a kickstart on it, since I broke my pelvis last year. It is high mileage, and I have no idea of the abuse that it may have had before I got it.

My thinking, now, is to clear a spot for it in the shop, and do a total rebuild. Mainly for peace of mind, and my wanting to take care of the old machine. That being said, up until the slick tire, and the broken pelvis, it has be one evermore fine, reliable machine. It has pulled duty as the first bike for many a beginner wanting to try out a 'Big Twin'. And, has caused a number of those people to purchase their own H-D. It was, for many years, my primary ride when I wasn't on a road trip on my 76 FLH. And, now that the 76 is totaled, my older machines will go back on the road first, as that one will be a major undertaking.

It was smooth at 55 to 65 mph, on the 2-lane backroads of N. Carolina. It has been from the ocean to the mountains of Tenn.. And, not all these miles with me aboard. I would plan to take an extended weekend camping trip by bike. Someone would find out, and ask to tag along. Many times, their ride would stay locked up in my shop, and load their gear on the 59. Needless to say, their confidence in it was directly affected by mine. I never hesitated to take it anywhere. The absolute only reason it did not take cross-country trips, was because I did not know what it looked like on the inside. So, I kept it's trips down to a few hundred miles.

That will change, soon. It will get a complete mechanical rebuild. Along with a complete electrical rebuild. I may leave the paint as-is, as it is not original, and the people around here have come to accept it's strange appearance. It has character.

Now, to my point. Detroitblue's question 'How Do I go Faster', and his comments that followed his question, made me think about how I view performance these days. My suggestion is to follow another suggestion that came later, from another poster. Experiment with the sprockets. I recommend a 24T engine sprocket, of the compensator variety (helps extend the life of the primary chain), and a 23T or 24T tranny sprocket. Don't automatically think in terms of the largest. As Cotten has alluded in his balance discussions, it's all about what's right for the machine. If it is set up to your liking, in appearance, and other gear, then work with the sprockets. It more than likely had a 22T tranny, when it was stock. Great for pulling tree stumps and hauling a load on gravel roads and mostly 2-lanes paved roads of the time. If you follow Cotten's instructions on eliminating manifold leaks, and have a well setup Linkert carb, you really can't ask for better on a Pan. I know that a modern CV is a great carburetor. But, so is the one that originally came on it. Try simple changes, back towards stock. Correct length pipes, if you don't want something like the originals. You can have a really great road machine with your Panhead.

I read the post by Fifty4, about 'Where Have All The Panheads Gone?'. Same place as mine, though not always for the same reason. It's just too easy to push a button, to get going. Not many willing to take the time to really learn their old machine, so that starting is never an issue. Riding and maintaining these bikes takes a personal touch by the owner. And, constant attention. Not because it's all that unreliable. Chains need lubing (maybe not as much with the newer chains) and adjusting. Most people never think about the little things like generator brushes. They stick on occasion. Easy to diagnose, if you make it a point to be aware of the little signs. Always have a good OEM service manual and parts manual on hand. H-D did provide some good troubleshooting tips in the service manual, if you are willing to read.

My '59 will make it's way back to the blacktops of the Carolinas and Virginia. First for many shakedown runs to debug the usual fresh rebuild gremlins that may come up. Then, more and more extended trips. Until finally, it will make it's way to the West Coast and a loop around the country. And, hopefully, many week-long trips to various ralleys and sights, like the many that the 76 made.

It was never a wallflower. Just a mushroom, at times. It will be pressed into service, again, as a primary bike, to provide somebody with their first real adventure on a vintage Harley. I used to make regular trips to the York, Pa. plant. Now, there are more and more private motorcycle museums that will be on the agenda.

I have a buddy, who's son is just turning 14, and has the bug, bad. He lives 4 hours from me, so I don't drop by very often. Maybe the 59 will be his first experience on a classic ride. Just like it was for his father. His very first ride on a Harley, and a few years later, he bought a stock 74 Police Special. And, lately, a new Electra-Glide TC. His wife is thoroughly hooked, as he carried her on her first road trip, recently.

I have rambled considerably, in this post. But, it boils down to the fact that reliability really starts with the right attitude about the machine. Decide that it will be what you want it to be by knowing it like you know no other machine. And, that you will be better at maintaining it, than any shop could ever be. And, don't experiment, unless you know what you are doing. Don't ever be afraid to do anything. Just have someone qualified close at hand to advise. I've been building and maintaining for a long time. I had the good fortune of having good advisors. They scolded when it was needed. But, mostly, they encouraged. And, gave me some of my first tools, to set the mold for my future passion in building.

Don't think in terms of what you can buy to be reliable. Think in terms of how you can make what you have reliable. It's easy. And, forgive me for rambling.

Jack



chucktx
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#2

Post by chucktx » Thu Jul 21, 2005 4:01 am

good post jack.....with a lot of truth........thanks
chucktx

Detroitblue
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Reliability

#3

Post by Detroitblue » Thu Jul 21, 2005 5:21 am

Jack I am always left feeling like Grass-hopper after reading your posts. There was a lot of useful information intertwined within a bit of nostaliga . I liked the Nostaliga as well as the information. I am going to take what you said under careful consideration before I do any major Mods.

Reading your comment I am reminded of my own experiences with my own Dad who's is still with me. As a boy I used to see that Pan sitting in the garage and it always had an old tin garbage lid underneath it to catch the oil drainage. For 40 years that bike always had a puddle beneath it in the garage. Now it is my bike, those old days are in the past as is the puddle of oil underneath the bike. Funny thing is that I still got that tin can lid, it was given to me along with the bike and I had to use it for while to catch the oil until I did the restoration. Now the tin lid is being used for what it was ment to be used for. It sits atop one my new style plastic garbage cans. It works great at keeping the raccoons from nawing a hole in the lid, like they do the plastic ones before rummaging through the garbage. I wish I could find a couple more of them tin lids now.

As for the bike, it has a belt drive primary now and no more leaks. This is the kind of thing I am hoping to hear about on the forum. Real solutions to age old problems. I am looking for some guy to crawl out of the wood works and expose' the details of how he achieved greatness from his machine. What he did, why he did it and how it improved his performance.

My dad was is a pretty talented mechanic especialliy with the cars. But he wasn't like professionally trained he just accumulated a lot of hands on over the years. He was just a natural talent and had a love for tinkering. However He just never seemed to put the love into the Harley like I would have preferred him to do. He didn't shine on it and chrome it out and dump and lot of money into it as far as I can tell. He painted her hisself about every 10 years or so but other then that he rode her jumped off and parked her and let her sit uncovered. It just seemed like he kept that bike running with duct tape and vise grips to me. But what do i know I was just a kid when he was really having his fun.

Back in the 60's and early 70's my Dad used to race Harleys at these events we called Field Meets. They road them panheads like dirt bikes. Can you imagine off roading with a Big V-twins. Hot rodding up and down in the dirt doing tricks and all kind of crazy stuff?

Funny thing is that I was just talking with my Dad recently about this very topic of performance and I was telling him of my desire to get more out of the bike. He replied "You just got done taking all the balls out of the bike. I had a Stroker Kit on there with the big cam everthing. How in the hell do you think that I used to pop wheelies in third gear and out run all my buddies.???

Well I was just floored by that. Here I had just restored the bike totally to stock and now he is telling that I had a hot set up on the bike. I had to go and open up all the boxes of spare parts and see for myself. But I guess it really dosen't matter because like I have said before, that bike was giving me hell. She wouldn't start for nothing, and when she ran it was all smoke and oil. She rattled something fierce it was almost embarrasing to ride her except for the fact she is a "58" and everybody could see she was old. The nail final nail in her coffin was that kicker action which is for the birds! I don't care what anybody says or who thinks it is vintage. It looks cool but damn all that jumping up and down just to get cranking. Truth is that at first I just wanted to see her restored to her original glory. For her to start up and run good and look good. Well she does that now.

When Dad said Stoker kit. I had never herd of one before. But Like I explained earlier this is the kind of thing I am trying to find out about. This started me to looking into hot setups and finding out the pro's and the cons of performance. By the way I installed a Techcycle started on my bike and now I don't heve to kick her no more. She starts like a dream with one push of the button. That was a real UPGRADE baby!

As far as I can recall Dad never took very many long trips on the bike when he had it. If he did we were following in Behind him with the trailer attached to the car. He claims he made a couple monumental trips down South and back but it was never a regular deal with him.

As far as my experiece goes the bike has only been good for short runs about town and a lot of tinkering after a few hundred miles or so. But she seems to be getting better and better. I am working out the bugs. And that is why I am doing a lot of research into different kinds of upgrades. I know that some guy have electronic ignitions installed as well as fuel injection. All kinds of things. The front disc brake is a common one.

My Dad says " I told ya to get a new Bike in the first place boy!" I replied " but this was your legacy, she's been in the family for years and I wanted to bring her back to life" " Well you certainly did that" he replied. I don't think he really gets it. One thing for sure, the bike never looked as good as it does now. The way I see it she was his mistress and now she is my Queen.

Dad told me a long time ago " Son you can't make a whore into a housewife! " I just never listen :?

Jack_Hester
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#4

Post by Jack_Hester » Thu Jul 21, 2005 11:52 am

As far as electrical systems go, the main advantage that the late alternators have over the generators would be the lack of brushes and higher current output. Other than that, some fine solid state regulators are available, to replace the OEM points style voltage regulators. My 59 has a points style regulator that's been on it since I bought it. More and more, electronic ignitions are becoming available as a direct retrofit for the points and condensor. I don't have one yet. So, I don't know if a coil change is in order with these. Anyway, if you are careful to check the brushes every few thousand miles (tug on them and make sure they aren't stuck in the slots), and put a drop of oil in the end bushing, the generator should have a good life. Don't plan to run a bunch of lights on a generator model. It will more than support the headlight, taillight, and ignition system. I think that if people would hand-trace every wire on their bike, and confirm it with a wiring diagram (make one if you don't have it), then you will always have a mental note as to where both ends of a conductor are. You would be amazed at how much you will remember, when you have the diagram in hand, looking for a problem. Once a year, take the OEM manual and do a systems check. It's usually a good Winter project. Then, you know what you are starting out with, when the riding season starts. You never hear of people doing it, but if the bike is a serious distance rider, a spare set of brushes should be packed, along with spare points and condenser (assuming you're still running that type ignition). However, pack the brushes individually, as they will crack and crumble, if carried with anything harder. You may not ever use them. Insurance.

It's rare to find any fused circuits on older machines. Always good to add a main fuse. Know the current capacity of your generator or alternator, and fuse accordingly. They are easy to hide. But, don't get carried away, so that you have difficulty getting to them in the dark. Pack a test light. The kind that has an alligator clip on one end of the lead, and a needle point on the tester. And, a pack of fuses. Plan how you will jumper power to the ignition, to get it to run, just in case you are somewhere that you need to be away from. Same for the lights. Figure how to bypass all else. You can troubleshoot much easier in the daylight, in front of the motel. Never hide fuses in headlight shrouds. No fun pulling that apart in the dark.

I like an ammeter and an oil pressure gauge to look at. There are few that look like they belong on a bike. But, my 59 doesn't care. I can troubleshoot oncoming problems, just by knowing what is normal on these two instruments. Most people don't care for them. That's fine. The lights are you first indication of a problem. However, they give no forwaring like a gauge can. You can see it coming, if you are observant.

Gotta go. Have a good one.

Jack

chucktx
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#5

Post by chucktx » Fri Jul 22, 2005 12:04 am

i am really enjoying this thread......thanks jack and detroit. i have owned my 65 for about 21 years. i purchased it from the original owner. it is a daily rider for me. i also do my own maintince, and like jack can tell when problem is starting. i was the first in my family to ride a bike, i think it would have been cool to get a handmedown. i look forward to reading more posts.......thanks!!!!!
chucktx

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#6

Post by mbskeam » Fri Jul 22, 2005 12:31 am

hello,
the one thing that I find with old bikes is if you dont fix a problem it soon can become a bigger problem.
and when going thru the parts and assys of the bike , ask your self is it good and will it make for a break down on the road, if yes then fix or replace, and your bike will give you many miles of care free ridin

mbskeam

Jack_Hester
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#7

Post by Jack_Hester » Fri Jul 22, 2005 3:22 pm

Chuck -

I wish that I could say that I had a handmedown. Only the enthusiasm. My Father owned a 1928 Indian 101. That was sometime in the early 30's, as he wrecked it in 32. A good friend of his completely rebuilt it, while he was laid up mending his bones. He hardley rode it, after that. He sold it to a cousin who destroyed it. The wreck may have hurt my Father badly, but that was something he never spoke of, as a negative. He always talked of how much he enjoyed it. That was my hook. When I brought my first (H-D) home, it made my Mother so mad, she said that she could bite nails (not meaning fingernails). My Father was more excited than I was. And, when I brought home the ServiCar, he took it up to the local store, to show it off to his buddies. My Mother stayed ill at him for a long time. He never rode it again, or ever spoke of motorcycles after that. Women can have that effect, sometimes. When I brought the 47 Chief home (bought it out of a junk yard), my Father was just as proud as he could be. But, no questions. So, I volunteered all the info, and told him that it was a temporary filler, until I could lay my hands on a 101. Never found one that I could afford while he was alive. Haven't looked, since he's been gone.

This was considerably off topic. But, the Evos and TC's are way too new, to have family history like this attached to them. So, it doesn't matter. It's all about keeping the old stuff on the road, for others to enjoy and envy.

Jack

Detroitblue
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Fun to read

#8

Post by Detroitblue » Fri Jul 22, 2005 6:54 pm

It was off the topic but a lot of fun to read :lol:

chucktx
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#9

Post by chucktx » Sat Jul 23, 2005 3:33 am

i will second that!!!!!!!!!
i have only owned pans and shovels.....started with a 49 pan in 67....have enjoyed every one and kept my hands greasy as well....sort of went with the territory......mech.....heavy and light. they were all daily drivers....while in the service it was the 49 rain, shine, even snow. lol lol to young to care i guess....wouldnt do it now tho, but it was the only transportation i had. they were all high milage bikes....ridden all over the east coast. i would not be afraid to strike out on my 65 tomorrow for anywhere in the lower 48, as long as i could stop to rest me every once in a while, the ol butt dont take the vibes as well as it used to!!!!!! lol lol. i feel very confident in the old machines for long distance running, just not at the same speeds that most of the new bikes run....80mph+.......
again...thanks for the posts.......i enjoy them
chucktx

64duo
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#10

Post by 64duo » Sat Jul 23, 2005 5:43 pm

As you can imagine, not all pan owners have a legacy of motorcycling in the family, nor have a great story of how our lifes have been wrapped around harley's for our entire life.
I grew up around Chicago, in the suburbs, and I never even heard a motorcycle, except for trips into the city where the Chicago police had quite a motorcyling presence on Duo's & servicars. When I was in high school, it seemed to be cool, it was a Mopar, or GTO that was the ticket.
I had developed an interest early, but as a kid still had to pass it by "mom", who like others was born with a allergic reaction to anything motorcyling. Forget about it.
This was forgotten until one day a Yamaha 750 triple was purchased by me when I was about 24. Rode for a summer, then sold it. About 8 years later a neighbor had a BMW 750/5 for sale, the price seemed pretty good and I owned my 2nd bike. My plans for my wife & I to enjoy the hobby of motorcycling was dashed when she was diagnosed with luekemia several weeks later, and that was that.
Spin ahead to a 45 year old man, now letting the emotions of motorcyling take over again, and I bought a 79 e-glide and went back and took a Motorcycle safety course and regained some skills lost over time. Sold and bought another shovel custom, 77 superglide made into chopper. Looked good, but realized I'm a little old for the "comforts" of the chopper ride.
Come to the present. 48 years old, I bought my 64FLH from a guy in Montana, after it was advertised on the internet. I live in a very remote part of Oregon and really have never seen many pans for sale. I wanted close to original, throw in some modern advantages if possible and rely on old biker friend for skills & mechanical ability. That was last year, I'm 2 weeks from 50, I spent last winter, (with the major help of my buddy) getting to know my panhead. Lots of notes, photographs etc. As I took things apart, I was praying it would go back together right. It was especially frustrating finding things not together correctly and having to figure out why, and what was needed to correct it. Funny how factory style bolts & spacers for example, make things fit better, (like the oil tank).
Not let me tell you, it is scarey buying a 40+ year old motorcycle, when your mechanical skills are LIMITED. Look at the posters here and on the old list and these folks have history, knowledge and skills making that ownership easier if not natural. I mean really, I struggle with figuring out the basics, why does gas in the tank and spark in the battery equal engine running. See it's not even that simple.
The panhead is the most beautiful motorcycle I have ever seen, the engine is artwork in metal. How could not every single person in the world want one? I especially get giggily wondering who else has sat on this seat over time and what they were thinking as they road the roads.
So, I wish my confidence was higher. I cringe to think there are panhead owners laughing or bitter that a real non-motorcycle person would even think of owning a pan. It's a tough club to get into. I remember the advise early I received, better not by a pan unless you have the skills and extensive tools. It was almost a challenge, a dare.
Well it is a challenge, I won't deny it. After the top end refresh this winter I struggled with retorqueing things after a few hundred miles of breakin, geeze, 2 head bolts and a couple case bolts, no way to get a wrench on them without taking the bike apart again. So right this minute I've got a real set of unevenly snugged up engine bolts. I struggle to figure out the solution.
I have asked some basic questions here, I seem to get honest anwers, which I' am sure the regulars may be tired of. What I really want is one of you experts to bring your tools and live in my garage. I want the bike to start on the 2nd kick, I want the bike to go from here to there without the concern of breakdown with my inability to figure out why, I want the bike to look and run the way it did brand new, takes skills I dont have, for example the knowledge to bring myself to put a linkert back on. Heck I have an old linkert, but am not knowledgeable enough to know what its condition is. The S&S seems to work, so....
I have learned some valuable lessons. Thanks to cotten, mike & jack and others. I HAVE pressure tested my system. I have read the threads over & over. I bought alot of the books and manuals.
I have the desire, just not the skills..........am I doomed to failure? I hope not. Meanwhile in the garage the pan has the left tank off, I'm trying to figure how to get a wrench on some head bolts and I am determined to carry on. My wife is waiting.
Wish me luck.

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#11

Post by panhead » Sat Jul 23, 2005 7:40 pm

One lesson I learned over the years is not to be afraid just to do things, even if you have never done it before. There is no magic involved, but logic (and the right tools and patience).

Detroitblue
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Growing up pan

#12

Post by Detroitblue » Sat Jul 23, 2005 9:06 pm

Growing up Pan was not all that great for me actually. It all started out pretty promising though. I was going to the Field Meets with my Dad and my Mom and friends. All of my Dads friends were in a biker gang/ Social Club. All of the young boys had or were destined to get mini bikes and then graduate to the real thing. Or so I thought. I got a blazing fast Mini bike on summer when I was about 10. I used to race in the Jr. catagory at the Field meets. I was very dissapointed to discover that Mark Spensers 3.5 hp mini bike could whip my 5.0 hp hands down every time he got the trophys. Mark spenser was Horace Spenser's boy. Horace and my Dad drank together and rode bikes together.

Eventually Mark got a Yamaha 150 or something like that. He also got some cool looking riding gear and he started doing tricks at the field meets and stuff. My Best friend Ben got a Bike too. He also had a go cart which his parents let him ride in the neighborhood. That was illegal. Well naturally I was beggin my Dad to get me a bike too. I was suppose to have one! He finally relented and we stopped by the local dealer and put a deposit on a Suziki 150 I was in heaven.

But something happened. we sold the Mini bike but the Suzuki never arrived. Just Never did. Mean time there was still Dads "58". Around 8th grade or Highschool I had gotton to be a big boy. Big enough to sit a stride the Harley. One day I attempted to balance her without the Kick stand and made the mistake of letting her tilt too far. Down she went. I couldn't hold her nor could I pick her back up again. When my father finally came and lifted her off the garage floor there was a big dent in the gas tank. I felt about 3 inches tall.

Fast foward a few years. I am 18. Feeling pretty manly now. After that little incident a few years back I was a little bike shy. But I could hold her up now with no problem. I decided to see if I could Kick start her. So as I begain to jump up and down on her, "snap" the kicker broke off. Once again I felt about 3inch tall. I was convinced that I was jinxed and would never ride that Harley.

Fast forward about 15 years. The bike is sitting in the garage alot now. Dads is hardly ever riding her any more. I'm starting to drop hints that it is my turn to ride her. Mom is adamently against it. It is now that I find out what happened to my Suzuki purchase. She say's " I forbade your father from buying you that morotcycle. You were already doing crazy tricks on your bicycle. The way I see it we saved you from any unnessasary mishaps. Well that maybe so but the way I saw it was that she stole my manhood from me. All my peers got their come-up-ance in the biker tradition except me.

Point is when I finally got the "58" I was no kind of Motorcycle mechanic. I Still know very little however I am mechanically inclined. A lot of the things are not to hard but the lack of knowledge translates in to Dollars and cents.

For my rebuild I basically paid a guy. I have about 25,000 into my bike. Maybe I could sell her for $14,000. But I never plan to sell so what the hell. I just felt she was too far gone and problematic for me to figure out how to get her straitened out in a hurry. And I was in a hurry. I had waited all my life to become the man I am now. A Harley Man . A biker Guy. I didn't want to spend five more years figuring out how to get her running right. So I told a guy just fix the engine and put that Starter kit on her. That snow balled into a total restoration and chrome replacement. I am really paying for it now. But when I am in the wind it is all worth it.

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#13

Post by Jack_Hester » Sat Jul 23, 2005 9:30 pm

64Duo -

I love Linkerts. Modern CV's are fantastic. I've owned various carbs over the years. Looking for that magic model. S&S has made some interesting stuff over the years. They provided the aftermarket with some good alternatives. But, I always come back to Linkerts. They are so tunable. Put one of Cotten's bullet-proof floats in it. Set it up properly. None better for your Duo Glide. I'm sure that will raise disagreement, so I'll qualify it with the note: just my opinion (from years of experience). There's always some priming involved, when starting any 'kickstart' bike. Usually, one or two kicks (you learn what it takes for your bike) with the ignition off, and choke on (cold engine). Then, partial choke and kickstarter at a point of partial compression, and ignition on. If your leg is strong, then a good steady shove thru. Otherwise, you can stand up on the kickstarter, but don't kick it like you are trying to stomp a hole in the ground. Think 'push'. Much better on the kickstarter gears and bushing. That bushing takes a beating. And, you don't wind up with a nice pile of metal shavings in the bottom, from an over active kickstarter. For the manual advance ignition models, I like to retard the spark only about halfway, before turning the ignition on. Again, it all depends on the bike. More retard, on some. When it fires, I immediately advance the spark, and then retard it back to get a nice steady hit, on the cold engine. I will tweak it a bit as it warms up, and I'm taking more of the choke off. When the choke is finally wide open (off), and the engine running at a fast idle (no macho 'potato potato potato' while it's cold), I will leave the timing there while pulling off in 1rst, and sometimes thru 2nd gear. After that, I'm advancing the timing to full, to get thru 3rd and High (notice: that's the most gears that I have on anything, except my Ford F-350). If you've kicked it more than a few times, and it's getting gas, you've flooded it. Open the throttle wide open and usually it will fire. Reduce throttle and advance the ignition, all in one motion.

Once you learn your starting technique, you'll never dread a kickstarter like a lot of people do. A kickstart bike is a well maintained and tuned bike. If it cranks easy, it will usually run well.

Jack

Detroitblue
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good knowledge

#14

Post by Detroitblue » Sat Jul 23, 2005 11:43 pm

Jack that was some valuable insite. That is actually worth writing down because I don't think that it is in the repair manual.

Opinions are subjective of course. They are made subjective by ones own personal experiences.

I have since learned first hand what Jack has just described. I don't think I could have really understood for mself without having gone through it. I can say that due to the fact that my bike runs so well now that I have a chance to see what she is suppose to do under normal circumstances. For example: if you fail to retard the spark on your first attempt when she is cold she will kick back like a mule. But if you retard the spark until after the first attempt to start then you can dial her spark in clock wise and with a little choke she will rumble. That is just my experience.

However when you are not working with ideal circumstances. When you have trouble with your machine... Well lets just say that you better bring an oxygen tank because you might have a coronary kicking on a bike that dosen't want to start. Nothing like having that push button there to get a good look see at what the problem is. Is she getting gas. Is she getting fire. Pull a plug and watch to see if the sparks jumps the gap. Real easy with a button.

I am running a Bendex carb. I hear they are pretty good carbs. Especially since you can squirt her by twisting the throttle one good time or two. But once again I have a limited experiece with anything else.

chucktx
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Location: texas

#15

Post by chucktx » Sun Jul 24, 2005 6:46 am

64duo.......some exellent advise there.....and i cant add anything to it for getting your bike to start in 2 kicks.....but i may be able to help with the headbolts and base nuts.......stop a mac tool truck or a snap on tool truck and ask for a combination box end wrench.....but it is going to be specially shaped.....it will be shaped in the form of the letter C.....with 9/16 on one end and 5/8 on the other. it will cost a few bucks, but will be worth it....they also have them in sets from 3/8 to 7/8. shy away from the ones from "discount stores".....as they will not get the job done.....they slip and break. if your handy with a rosebud and know the procedure for re hardining, you can make your own from a quality straight box end wrench.......hope this helps a bit........
chucktx

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