Price stock 1960 Duo Glide

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Patience
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Price stock 1960 Duo Glide

#1

Post by Patience » Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:04 am

I'm new to the site so I hope this is an ok place to post this question.

I have an opportunity to purchase a stock 1960 Duo Glide. It was driven into a garage three years ago and has just been sitting there. It's stock and in great shape. Any guidance on what I should pay would be most appreciated.

If this is the wrong place to post this I meant no disrespect.



FlatHeadSix
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Re: Price

#2

Post by FlatHeadSix » Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:59 am

Patience, welcome!
You are in the right place to start asking any questions you might have about panheads, don't be afraid to ask.

The bike in question is hard to appraise without seeing it or knowing anything about its history, If it really is stock and in great shape as you said, and it was running and driven as recently as 3 years ago, then I would say without even looking that 8 to 10K would be a reasonable starting place for negotiation. It could very well be worth way more than that depending on what it is.

Get some pictures and a complete history if possible and, by all means, keep us posted.

mike

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Re: Price

#3

Post by Cotten » Tue Jan 13, 2009 2:04 pm

Patience!

Some words of caution:

"Stock", like 'restored', 'original', and other vague descriptions often mean different things when sellers use the terms rather than buyers.

It could have Factory shovelhead parts all over it, and they would still be "stock".

And bikes for sale always ran great when they were parked!

Along with clear close-up photos for others to critique (including the VIN boss), you can arm yourself ahead of time with critical information that you will use later if you acquire the machine or another: Bruce Palmer's "How to Restore Your Harley-Davidson" (Motorbooks International) contains a thorough and definitive description of how '37 to '64 machines were produced,... ideally.

A rough machine that is mostly "correct" as it was produced is worth a great deal more than a shiny paint-jobber full of hardware store bolts and evil chrome parts that shouldn't be.
The difference between a truly un-molested example and a rolling pile o' parts can easily be as much as $10G.

Looking forward to your photos,

....Cotten

PanHeadRed
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Re: Price

#4

Post by PanHeadRed » Wed Jan 28, 2009 3:28 pm

Like this one?
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VT

Re: Price

#5

Post by VT » Wed Jan 28, 2009 3:41 pm

Nice. You know that once you remove every part, it will all go back together without a problem. A "walk in the park" compared with building a kit from boxes. I'd forgotten how easy restoration is till I saw this. Now, at least, you'll be able to buy 3.5 gallon tanks off the shelf, maybe not with emblem indents, but they have '59-60 stick-emb's.
Harley sells the seats. Keep the pistons under 0.070" overbore and you have a good investment that you can also ride. Win-win.

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Re: Price

#6

Post by Cotten » Wed Jan 28, 2009 4:29 pm

VT wrote:Keep the pistons under 0.070" overbore and you have a good investment that you can also ride. Win-win.
There is little to fear but sloppy technique.
Properly torque-plate fitted, even a .100" overbore will run stronger and quieter than an auto shop poke-n-hope .070" overbore.
(Yes, .080" to .100" pistons are readily available.)

PanHeadRed's photo makes one wonder if the carb didn't catch fire.

....Cotten

Arthur
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Re: Price

#7

Post by Arthur » Wed Jan 28, 2009 5:28 pm

Actually, that looks pretty good. Wash it and check the compression before you do a lot of unnecessary work. Unless you want to compete for AMCA points, you may not need to do much. You can get seats and tanks on ebay or at swap meets. And, regardless of what you gave for it, it will be worth a lot more once its complete and running, even if it's not concours condition.

PanHeadRed
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Re: Price

#8

Post by PanHeadRed » Thu Jan 29, 2009 2:26 pm

Cotton, here is the rest of it. Carb/ Back Plate and Seat are in other pictures

Arthur, the wireing and spark cables were shot, as was the rear brake system. The clutch hub key was sheared, the handle bars bent, the cables were so-so, and a few small bulbs were burnt out. I put the carb on and I got it to back fire a few times, but decided to go through it completely. No resto, just a rider, I want it mechanicaly sound, rattle can paint is fine. You don't want to know what I paid, I could probably sell the tanks, handle bars, speedo (works), & carb, and break even.
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Arthur
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Re: Price

#9

Post by Arthur » Thu Jan 29, 2009 4:48 pm

With that extra infomation, I agree you are wise to take it apart and go through it. I like your plan. Good luck.

Ripley/Fla
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Re: Price

#10

Post by Ripley/Fla » Thu Jan 29, 2009 11:05 pm

Please sell your items in the classified section. Thanks!

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