what is the best carb cleaner?

Forum rules
Please do not start new topics here, but here: New Panhead and Flathead topics
Post Reply
john HD
Moderator
Posts: 3661
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 7:24 pm
Bikes: '42 WLA X 2, '55FL, '93 Ultra Classic, '91 Fatboy, '97 883, '71 Suzuki Duster 125, '83 GPz 750.

what is the best carb cleaner?

#1

Post by john HD » Sun Oct 21, 2007 5:49 pm

about to embark on cleaning my newly purchased linkert prior to rebuilding it.

what is the best cleaner for getting the black crud out of the carb?

i have an old gallon of berryman's with the dip basket, don't know if it is any good.

john



Robert Luland
Posts: 888
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2007 7:56 pm
Bikes: 1922JD, 1937 ULH, 1946FL 1948FL, 1957FL, 1960FLH, 1965XLCH, 1995 FLHT
Location: Hoboken, NJ
Contact:

#2

Post by Robert Luland » Sun Oct 21, 2007 7:14 pm

John you got me thinking. When I rebuild trannys I take the case around the corner to the transmission shop and he throws it in what they call the soup. Litterly a boiling coldron. The next morning its spotless and this includes black rinkle paint. In to the glass beader and on to the bench. No matter what caberator cleaner I've gotten at the auto store they do a half ass job. I have tried the Gunk one with the basket. Damm carb came out looking like it did when I put it in. I have a couiple of junk Linkerts laying around and some day this week I'm going drop one in the soup and see how it fairs. If some thinks I shouldn't do this speak now. John I'll let ya know by the end of the week how it all works out. Bob

ozwick86
Site sponsor
Site sponsor
Posts: 729
Joined: Sat Jul 17, 2004 4:06 am
Bikes: '59 Pan FLHF
Location: N. California

RE: what is the best carb cleaner?

#3

Post by ozwick86 » Sun Oct 21, 2007 7:48 pm

JohnHD,

I would ask Cotten this question as he is rebuilding 2 Linkert's for me right now. Beware of using glass beads to clean. Cotten said that my other Linkert had the most glass beads he had ever encountered down inside the carb. Good thing I didn't run it on the bike.

john HD
Moderator
Posts: 3661
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 7:24 pm
Bikes: '42 WLA X 2, '55FL, '93 Ultra Classic, '91 Fatboy, '97 883, '71 Suzuki Duster 125, '83 GPz 750.

#4

Post by john HD » Sun Oct 21, 2007 9:37 pm

mark, bob,

that is why i am asking, i had a chance for cotten to review my carb at davenport.

the discussion of glass beads screwing things up did occur.

for my application the carb gets painted black. so shining it up is not as important as having it operate properly.

i did pass on about a dozen or so linkerts at davenport that were as shiney as the day they were cast. i skipped them on purpose!

never thought about boiling it out at another shop.

john

Robert Luland
Posts: 888
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2007 7:56 pm
Bikes: 1922JD, 1937 ULH, 1946FL 1948FL, 1957FL, 1960FLH, 1965XLCH, 1995 FLHT
Location: Hoboken, NJ
Contact:

#5

Post by Robert Luland » Sun Oct 21, 2007 11:25 pm

John I didn't think of it ether until about three years ago when one of my trucks blew a tranny. Now Heads and cases all go into the soup!

Cotten
Posts: 6791
Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2002 9:09 am
Location: Central Illinois

#6

Post by Cotten » Mon Oct 22, 2007 1:17 am

There's nothing wrong with glass beads as long as they are finer than the pit-run gravel that most autoshops use.

Big 'uns stick, but it only takes a sharpened feelergauge to remove them:(attached). Look at the enormous one on the bottom left!
The whole point is that cleaning up afterwards becomes a more attentive task than the blasting itself.

I have four cabinets so far, with aluminum oxide at the most aggressive extreme, then fine beads, steel shot for texture, and then walnut hulls to gently preserve plating patinas.

...Cotten
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

john HD
Moderator
Posts: 3661
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 7:24 pm
Bikes: '42 WLA X 2, '55FL, '93 Ultra Classic, '91 Fatboy, '97 883, '71 Suzuki Duster 125, '83 GPz 750.

#7

Post by john HD » Mon Oct 22, 2007 1:24 am

nice photos cotten!

so short of blasting my carb there is no good way to remove the crud with a solvent or cleaner?

just trying to do my homework before diving into this adventure.

what is your opinion about jetting with modern fuels?

i think i have a number 18 jet, my bike is mostly stock as you saw.

any reccomendations as a starting point? i understand the power needle is a very fine adjustment.

john

Cotten
Posts: 6791
Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2002 9:09 am
Location: Central Illinois

#8

Post by Cotten » Mon Oct 22, 2007 1:03 pm

John!

The most digestive chemical cleaner I can think of is P4gas itself.

I just haven't the patience for extended soaking other than stripper for paint, and mineral spirits to get gooey debris off, to keep my blastcabinets clean.

One carb on the bench right now needed a MEK soak only because of loctite in everything. The only chemical that every carb encounters through my shop is Simple Green.
Someday I'll find a "sonic" tank in a dumpster...
And someday I'll have a blastcabinet filled with soda. But in the meantime, cleaning is always labor intensive.

The evils of controlled blasting are few; the evils of poor pre-prep and incomplete cleaning thereafter are infinite.

On to jetting:
Since the specific gravity of pump fuels are all very close, it is hard to predict any settings. We know ethanol blends need a bit more because of the difference in "volumetric efficiency", but it would be futile to try to "think" the carb to a better setting.

We can only start with stock specs, and trial-and-error from there.

....Cotten
PS: I don't think the 'power' needle on an M74B does much of anything!

john HD
Moderator
Posts: 3661
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 7:24 pm
Bikes: '42 WLA X 2, '55FL, '93 Ultra Classic, '91 Fatboy, '97 883, '71 Suzuki Duster 125, '83 GPz 750.

#9

Post by john HD » Mon Oct 22, 2007 2:15 pm

cotten

thanks for your reply, my intent is to have the parts cleaned properly before i hand my carb over to my motor specialist.

his rate is the same weather he is doing things beyond my capabilities or scrubbing crud with a toothbrush!

when i send my truck at the power company into the garage for service, it always gets a bath first!

john

Robert Luland
Posts: 888
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2007 7:56 pm
Bikes: 1922JD, 1937 ULH, 1946FL 1948FL, 1957FL, 1960FLH, 1965XLCH, 1995 FLHT
Location: Hoboken, NJ
Contact:

#10

Post by Robert Luland » Mon Oct 22, 2007 9:10 pm

Cotten. I Use walnut when I reload to tumble the brass in. I never new you could get it fine enough to run though the beader. Is there a perticuler supply house you deal with for beading supplys? Bob

Cotten
Posts: 6791
Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2002 9:09 am
Location: Central Illinois

#11

Post by Cotten » Tue Oct 23, 2007 1:08 am

Bob!

I stocked up on extrafine beads so long ago the company is gone.

For media such as Russian ALOX or oriental walnut hulls, its hard to beat http://www.harborfreight.com/. Its probably only a matter of time before they offer plastic, steel shot, and soda. Carbide nozzles would be nice, too!

....Cotten
Doh! I now see they have two grades of shot already, and "starblast" by the pound whateverthatis.

Jack_Hester
Posts: 414
Joined: Sat Sep 18, 2004 7:21 pm
Location: Roxboro, NC, U.S.A.
Contact:

#12

Post by Jack_Hester » Tue Oct 23, 2007 10:41 am

Cotten -

I tried soda in my blast cabinet. Man, did it leave a nice finish. Two major problems. So much dust that you can't see. Reason for the first problem is the second. It stopped up a brand new vacuum filter in less than 10 minutes. Now I know why people use it outside, and let the wind carry it away.

Jack

Cotten
Posts: 6791
Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2002 9:09 am
Location: Central Illinois

#13

Post by Cotten » Tue Oct 23, 2007 12:41 pm

Jack!

Those are problems with any extrafine media, I suspect.

My collectors are double 'shopvacs': First an empty one to act as a cyclone, and a second with a bucket-sized Caterpillar airfilter ahead of the motor. (And then a sock over the exhaust.)
They still need weekly attention, but the cyclone buckets are usually easily dumped back into the cabinet, as the heavier unspent media lands there.

The problems I was warned of previously were that soda breaks down with a single use, and moisture makes it clump badly. And it wasn't cheap enough for me.
Years ago, I was told that ground corn husks were the ultimate blasting "polish". It would take me quite some time to fill a cabinet with a blender, though.


....Cotten

Cotten
Posts: 6791
Joined: Mon Aug 26, 2002 9:09 am
Location: Central Illinois

The best carb cleaners...

#14

Post by Cotten » Fri Oct 26, 2007 2:41 am

I can't keep a secret..
Here's my best carb cleaners!

....Cotten
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Pantony
Posts: 145
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 3:23 pm
Location: Milwaukee Wisconsin

#15

Post by Pantony » Mon Nov 26, 2007 12:21 am

Jack-Hester try using a drywall bag in a shop vac to pull away the soda dust, it won't clog up

Post Reply

Return to “Carburetor/Fuel system”