Rigid Frame

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chuck 56 pan
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Rigid Frame

#1

Post by chuck 56 pan » Tue Apr 02, 2013 12:20 am

I have rode bikes most all of my life, My 1st car was a bike. 45 years later,This is my 1st rigid, Something is different. This thing handles very nice, I will discribe it as Nimble. Now, having experienced the Rigid Frame Pan, I will discribe all my past bikes with swingarms as wishie washie. Riding Vintage, Too much fun in Washington State.

Chuck!



RUBONE
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Re: Rigid Frame

#2

Post by RUBONE » Tue Apr 02, 2013 12:41 am

Go rigid or go home.. :mrgreen:
And if you really want to experience a good handling rigid, put 18" wheels on it. Or just buy an older bike.

indianut
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Re: Rigid Frame

#3

Post by indianut » Fri Apr 05, 2013 5:29 pm

RUBONE wrote:Go rigid or go home.. :mrgreen:
And if you really want to experience a good handling rigid, put 18" wheels on it. Or just buy an older bike.
If you REALLY want to experience a Fantastic handling rigid, put 18" wheels and a Trailing Link (Indian) front end on it!!!

ingram
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Re: Rigid Frame

#4

Post by ingram » Fri Apr 05, 2013 9:41 pm

chuck 56 pan wrote:I have rode bikes most all of my life, My 1st car was a bike. 45 years later,This is my 1st rigid, Something is different. This thing handles very nice, I will discribe it as Nimble. Now, having experienced the Rigid Frame Pan, I will discribe all my past bikes with swingarms as wishie washie. Riding Vintage, Too much fun in Washington State.

Chuck!
What type of seat are you running? A stock pogo seat or something else?

chuck 56 pan
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Re: Rigid Frame

#5

Post by chuck 56 pan » Fri Apr 05, 2013 11:47 pm

ingram wrote:
chuck 56 pan wrote:I have rode bikes most all of my life, My 1st car was a bike. 45 years later,This is my 1st rigid, Something is different. This thing handles very nice, I will discribe it as Nimble. Now, having experienced the Rigid Frame Pan, I will discribe all my past bikes with swingarms as wishie washie. Riding Vintage, Too much fun in Washington State.

Chuck!
What type of seat are you running? A stock pogo seat or something else?
My seat is stock pogo

58flh
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Re: Rigid Frame

#6

Post by 58flh » Sat Apr 06, 2013 12:40 pm

I agree--Its RIGID or dont bother for me!--I rode everything I ever worked on & owned 2 swingers that were nice Ironheads, but they sat & sat & you get it!---Richie :mrgreen:

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Re: Rigid Frame

#7

Post by Cotten » Sat Apr 06, 2013 4:52 pm

Irony Time, Folks,...

When we were young and reckless, only a rigid was affordable, as mature and sensible Folks wanted a suspension. It transfered mojo to the rear wheel much better anyway, and we were happy.

A few seasons pass in a heartbeat, and many of us found ourselves packing up a bagger to accomodate our needs, and the comfort of significant others. Let us call that 'middle age'.

For some of us, even those glory days are past unless we can push the damn thing out of its stall.

Less is better, and rigids make good sense.

....Cotten
PS: Indianut!
I fear that I may never feel my '34 Chief roll.
Just another obstacle is that the leafspring pack was powercoated solid.

Bosheff
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Re: Rigid Frame

#8

Post by Bosheff » Mon Apr 08, 2013 5:00 pm

Nuthin rides or handles like a rigid. Shitcan the pogo set-up. If ya want a bit of suspension, let some air outta the rear tire....bosheff

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Re: Rigid Frame

#9

Post by Cotten » Mon Apr 08, 2013 6:08 pm

I gotta disagree, Bosheff!

The elegantly simple sprung seat design is ideal.
It places your mass where you have optimum leverage and control over the mass of the machine,
it places your feet where they belong,
your face where it can properly look over the windscreen, if you choose one,
and.. oh yeah,...
it saves your sacroilliac.

.....Cotten

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Re: Rigid Frame

#10

Post by old.wrench » Mon Apr 08, 2013 7:04 pm

Before you shit-can the stock pogo set up, try tuning it to fit your weight and the way you ride. With the right springs and the travel properly set, you just might change your mind. There are 3 separate systems of springs you can tweak - cushion, rebound, and auxiliary You can also fine tune by adjusting the travel length and the initial compression of the cushion springs. Take any slop or wiggle out of the parts by rebuilding,shimming, or replacement. Dial it in and enjoy the ride. If you've got a wore-out or wrecked back it makes all the difference in the world!

rmcrh
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Re: Rigid Frame

#11

Post by rmcrh » Mon Apr 08, 2013 7:29 pm

I could not agree more. A properly set up pogo is a great ride. Front bushings tight . I do not use the bushing for the frame as it usually just mates to the frame opening which is egg shaped. I use a brass bushing that is close and fit it from there to the post with a hone. The springs for the pogo are available from a fellow I found from this site, I believe Dave Croft in different weight ranges . As " One of the big boys' I cannot speak more highly of a well set up pogo. Again the emphasis is on being well set up on all of the points including rear seat height as this is a scissor action not up and down
I also would like to hear more comments on the leading link front end as I am completing a Chief project using Kiwi's replica front end and found little information and or reviews of this front end in general as Indian Nut indicated.
Robb

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Re: Rigid Frame

#12

Post by 1962FLH » Tue Apr 09, 2013 2:28 am

Robb I have a 1939 Indian Chief transmission complete with clutch for sale if you know somebody who needs one?

Bosheff
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Re: Rigid Frame

#13

Post by Bosheff » Tue Apr 09, 2013 5:11 pm

I am 5' 15" tall. The pogo set-up sets me up to high and to far forward. Pogo set-ups will wear between the pogo stick and the bushings causing slop. A pogo set-up fits loosely between the T-Bar and the moiunting tab at the top of the pogo causing more slop. Eliminate the slop and you get a real feel for the road. Just my experience....bosheff

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