1949-1953 handlebars and throttle

Chassis, frame, instruments, fenders etc.
Forum rules
Please do not start new topics here, but here: New Panhead and Flathead topics
Post Reply
EasyDuz'er
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 7:06 pm
Location: Florida

1949-1953 handlebars and throttle

#1

Post by EasyDuz'er » Sat Jan 01, 2005 10:06 pm

What is a push throttle and a pull throttle. Do you need one of each when ordering handlebar internals or is it either or? I am looking through the v-twin catalog and I cannot tell what I need.



VT

#2

Post by VT » Sun Jan 02, 2005 1:03 am

Both throttle and spark spirals are the push type. You push the throttle control wire to push the Linkert throttle open. You also push the spark control wire to push the circuit breaker to full advance. All 54-up re-pop spirals (no matter who sells them) were made with a metric i.d. instead of an SAE i.d., therefore you need to try and find two of those OEM at http://www.nosparts.com/
You asked about '49-53 re-pops and they may or may not be made wrong as well. If you want to speak to a living human being that knows what you need, call Kick-Start M/C Parts (616) 245-8991.
"Pull" spirals were used on Hummers, but, also now, for the throttle spiral (only) on a Big Twin when using Bendix carburetors, because the Bendix throttle is "pulled" open. The "pull" throttle is now important for that reason.
Last edited by VT on Mon Jan 03, 2005 2:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

EasyDuz'er
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 7:06 pm
Location: Florida

Mechanical Advance vs. Auto Advance Distributors

#3

Post by EasyDuz'er » Sun Jan 02, 2005 3:08 pm

Are the mechanical advance distributors reliable or do they require constant readjustment. Is there a separate push cable for the spark from the throttle push? If I go with the replica panhead motor in lieu of the STD/S&S modified motor will the spark advance assembly function well? How often does one have to adjust or replace the points in the mechanical distributor.

Thanks

Easy

VT

#4

Post by VT » Sun Jan 02, 2005 4:32 pm

The mechanical circuit breakers are made in China by the same company that makes V-Twins "automatic" distributors. Good track record. I have a re-pop mechanical c.b. and it looks good. Retard and advance action is good. Points stay in adjustment. Minor tune-ups (static timing the motor) is simple. No strobe lights necessary. The spirals are the same for spark and throttle(56220-53). Go with a V-Twin replica Panhead motor. Build a '54-up rigid or '59 Pan. You need two OE spirals (56220-53) and the re-pop one-piece '54-59 handlebars. And a Linkert M74-B carb. The motors may not be in stock at present. Find out. Only V-Twin makes the Linkert intake heads. The complete Glide front forks were back-ordered in November. Find out if they have them in stock yet. Building a replica is expensive. It will cost you almost as much as a new Harley to just for the parts in boxes. Not for the general public. I'm building two at present. My advise is to have another M/C to ride while you build the replica. People will come online and tell you V-Twin is junk, etc. I'm here to say it's not so. Believe the naysayers or believe me.
Last edited by VT on Mon Jan 03, 2005 2:31 am, edited 2 times in total.

EasyDuz'er
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 7:06 pm
Location: Florida

#5

Post by EasyDuz'er » Sun Jan 02, 2005 4:43 pm

Thanks for the info. That is helpful. Follow up to the comments that the replica is expensive. It appears that it is going to cost about $16,000.00 just for the parts. Is this about right? If I want a rigid pan in new condition and the enjoyment and pride of building it myself, is there really any alternative to building a replica? Would it not be as or more expensive to buy an old bike and to restore it? The two replicas you are building are they for your own riding or for resale?

Thanks

Easy

EasyDuz'er
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 7:06 pm
Location: Florida

#6

Post by EasyDuz'er » Sun Jan 02, 2005 4:53 pm

As to the stock vtwin replica motor. Which one should I add to my list of parts if I go with a 54 up rigid. I have attached a page from the catalog.

Thanks

Easy

EasyDuz'er
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 7:06 pm
Location: Florida

#7

Post by EasyDuz'er » Sun Jan 02, 2005 4:59 pm

Do I use plumber or o-ring style motor. Also, I assume I should get stock exhaust ports, right?
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

VT

#8

Post by VT » Sun Jan 02, 2005 6:41 pm

Get either the (10-1996), '48-53, motor if you want to run the proven 6V solid state relay and 3-brush generator....or the (10-2016), '55-61, if you want to run a voltage regulator. With the '48-53 you'll have the plumbing-style intake manifolds (Eight places where manifold leaks could occur: Both sides of two ferrules; [though Peek seals are available for ferrules]; two manifold spigots; and the two rivets makes eight) or, go with the rubber O-ring, '55-61 dependable manifold. Find an M75 74" Knuckle, M74, or M74-B Linkert first. Any one of the carbs will work fine on 74".
Stay away from the 3-bolt Shovel-exhaust heads...they don't look real when finished (in my opinion only).
There have been one or two folks that have come on this site with thoughts about building a machine.
We have a contact within V-Twin. He just finished a 6-month photo session for the '05 catalog. He's the parts resource-technician for everything they make or sell; ex-Army motor pool and holds a big-rig license. Anytime they make a move in the V-Twi? semi, they need him to transport everybody to where they're going. He'll go where they kick him next, now that the catalog has gone to press (and we'll follow him). Next, he's headed back to the "bin search" dept., where we all need him most. Then there's also a principal over in Conn. at Corbin-Gentry, who's the frame guy. He taught us how to install the headstock lock. So, we have all the contacts we need now. Sometimes we're flying under the radar with mfgrs. and it's always because of the "liability issue," but we can move around the warehouse and nose through bins with JW, and search-out and identify mechanical problems we find on Knuckle and rigid Pans. This season, is the perfect time to build if you're going to, since I'm building the same style of machines. Knuckle and rigid Pans. Don't go big inch or we can't help you. 6V or you're on your own. 12V is not perfected for us yet the way WE like it. "Above" and beyond any of the bad parts you might receive...be polite...send the parts back at your own expense most times, and learn something about enthusiast life. You will.
It was told to me, that "In the re-pop world we're all connected (same wants, needs and interest's in antique or replication) but, we're are all alone too". This "building" is a huge undertaking that can leave you in the middle, wondering what you got yourself into.
Last edited by VT on Mon Jan 03, 2005 2:44 am, edited 4 times in total.

VT

#9

Post by VT » Mon Jan 03, 2005 12:40 am

(VT doesn't know how to post a quote on this box) EZ wrote "If I want a rigid pan in new condition and the enjoyment and pride of building it myself, is there really any alternative to building a replica? Would it not be as or more expensive to buy an old bike and to restore it? The two replicas you are building are they for your own riding or for resale?

VT replys- Find an OE machine that's 74", or, if you're set up with a lift and your own, dedicated-half of a two-car garage; with a rolling toolbox and an income of enough so that your family doesn't suffer one iota, and weekends off (days in a row), you could do it. I can point out the bad stuff and what to look for on this site. The way it's set-up here now, is that any contankerous postings, that are outside of the progressive building spirit, and hinder the forging through this replica-wilderness, will get deleted by the sargent-of-arms :twisted: without deleting the topic. 8) This place is actually an un-authorized V-Twin? builders site, but is owned and paid for by an enthusiast, who,.... receives nothing.... from no body... except donations. Feature that.
I donated a lousy 17 Euros and got a thank you.
My replicas? I plan to build them, register them, and put the first 2,000 miles on 'em using Harley-Davidson 20W50 oil, and then try and sell them "used" on this site, or someplace where I'm allowed to donate some money for the favor. The selling price will be reflected by how much time and money I put into each one. Auction in Las Vegas at a reserve? Why not? You've seen what they sell as far as proto-type cars and replicas - all "mag wheeled", but the spare under the trunk is a regular "steel rim". Nice touch. Har! And they sell a lot of... "that". We're building a new market here and having some fun. Thank you for asking.

awander
Posts: 1127
Joined: Fri Sep 21, 2007 3:03 am
Bikes: '52 FL
'64 FLH

Re: 1949-1953 handlebars and throttle

#10

Post by awander » Tue May 18, 2010 11:10 pm

VT Wrote:
You also push the spark control wire to push the circuit breaker to full advance.
But that is incorrect. You pull the cable to get the circuit breaker to full advance.

The same exact assembly is used on both sides of the handlebars, so that when you roll the respective grips toward you, you get push on the throttle(right side)[opens the linkert throttle plate], and you get pull on the advance(left side)[advances the circuit breaker].

Post Reply

Return to “Chassis, Frame & Instruments”