Tin primary drain fitting

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keiser
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Tin primary drain fitting

#1

Post by keiser » Mon May 05, 2008 8:30 pm

I have a tin inner primary that is in very good condition other than the drain fitting was torn off some time in the past. I have a new fitting but I seriously doubt the wisdom of trying to weld this fitting on the tin. Several welders have told me they don't feel they can get enough penetration of the fitting before burning through the tin.

How have others handled replacing this fitting? Was it welded originally? I am considering welding the fitting to a bit thicker sheet metal and then spot welding this whole thing onto the primary tin.

Obviously this is a poor design as I have never seen a tin inner for sale with the fitting still intact.



51Hog
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#2

Post by 51Hog » Mon May 05, 2008 8:34 pm

Anyone who can TIG--And has the proper equipment--heat control--Can do it.
Otherwise, Braising will hold it.

FlatHeadSix
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Re: Tin primary drain fitting

#3

Post by FlatHeadSix » Mon May 05, 2008 9:36 pm

keiser wrote:Obviously this is a poor design as I have never seen a tin inner for sale with the fitting still intact.
Exactly right Keiser, the originals didn't stay on there very long. I ripped mine off years ago jumping off a curb. I felt bad about it for a little while (not very long) and then forgot about it and never even attempted to put it back on.

Like 51Hog says, anyone with a good TIG wire-feed should be able to tack it back on, but it will probably get knocked off again anyway.

mike

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#4

Post by 51Hog » Tue May 06, 2008 12:31 am

I like mine on there. I just push a piece of clear hose about 6" long on the nipple, and using the natural bend in the hose, aim it down in front of the center of the rear tire. (There is not enough oil coming out of the drain
While in motion to worry about.) The inside of my fender has no more oil on it than before. The difference is that I have very little if any oil on the whitewall. Works great for me.

Actually, if you are near an aircraft repair shop---The shops that work on rag wing planes, they can either gas weld or tig the nipple to the tin.

john HD
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#5

Post by john HD » Tue May 06, 2008 12:55 am

braze it on.

john

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#6

Post by Cotten » Tue May 06, 2008 2:02 am

For reasons I cannot explain (a pro welder I am not), the pressed and stressed metal in primary covers is not very friendly to braze or TIG repairs. Distortions are inevitable.

They have frustrated many a true pro.

I rarely worry about the fitting, as it only moves the spot on the floor.
Getting the drool tube onto the fitting is far more trouble than it is worth.

Just an opinion,

....Cotten

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#7

Post by 51Hog » Tue May 06, 2008 3:55 am

I am not a pro welder either.
But---I have done more than my share of TIG---Not to be confused with MIG(Wire feed) Which I also have done quite a bit of. My Stick welding looks like a chicken S**t all over the place--and had diarrhea!!
With both TIG and MIG, if the proper heat is used, there would be minimal distortion. The more area that is heated while welding, the more distortion will occur. The trick is, while welding sheet metal, only weld in SHORT Stitches. I always tack both ends, then the middle, then the center of the 2 spaces. etc... Keep work cool.
When I weld thin sheet metal, Auto body and thinner with a TIG, there is never more than 1/2 inch of paint burnt on either side of the weld.
My inner primary tin was TOAST where it mounts around the crank.
Many cracks and pieces missing. When I finished repairing it and grinding the welds, other than a little deformity which I couldn't get out using heat and wet rags, the primary looked new.
I also managed to save the old tool box that was falling off due to stress cracks.
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