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1959 charging system:necessary to polarize

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ozwick86
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1959 charging system:necessary to polarize

#1

Post by ozwick86 » Fri Oct 21, 2005 3:25 pm

Is it necessary to polarize the generator when a solid state voltage regulator is installed

Is it necessary to polarize the generator when a solid state voltage regulator is installed?

And

What should the maximum output voltage be that is sent from the regulator to charge the battery? Is there a easy way to check my charging system without having to use an Amp meter, since I don't own one?

Thanks,

ozwick



rigidpanman
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Re: 1959 charging system:necessary to polarize

#2

Post by rigidpanman » Fri Oct 21, 2005 9:02 pm

if you have a voltmeter you can use that,just run it between the battery terminals.otherwise i would run the bike up to about 2000 rpms or so and see how bright the headlite is.that might work

kell
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Re: 1959 charging system:necessary to polarize

#3

Post by kell » Sat Oct 22, 2005 6:46 pm

Supposedly you don't need to polarize if you run an electronic regulator. But if the system is not charging, go ahead and polarize it. You don't have anything to lose, and it might get it going again.

When I tried testing my bike with a digital voltmeter it didn't work very well. Must be electrical hash coming from the sparking brushes on the commutator. Even with the meter leads connected right at the battery, the readout on my digital meter jumps around too much to get a reading.
On the other hand, an old-fashioned analog meter with a needle will give you a steady reading. I've noticed that el cheapo analog meters can be pretty inaccurate though. It might be worth it to shell out a few extra bucks and get a decent analog meter.

14.5 volts is about right for charging.

ozwick86
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Re: 1959 charging system:necessary to polarize

#4

Post by ozwick86 » Sat Oct 22, 2005 7:10 pm

Kell,

Thanks, but I still have the original 6 volt setup. Is 7.5-7.6 volts about right?

Thanks,

ozwick

kell
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Re: 1959 charging system:necessary to polarize

#5

Post by kell » Sat Oct 22, 2005 11:12 pm

I guess. 7.5 to 7.6 corresponds to 15 or 15.2 volts on a twelve volt battery. That is okay on an automotive system, not sure about a bike. If you have a big enough battery, it should take it. Smaller batteries can overheat from the charging, not so much because of the voltage but because the regulator tries to force too much charging current into the battery to force the voltage up while the battery is still at a low state of charge. When the battery is low it needs to be charged with a low current, regardless of the voltage. For 5 amp battery that means a maximum of about 1.5 amps charging current. A twelve amp battery could handle 3.6 amps charging current according to the published standards. That is conservative, a battery might accept more than the stated 30% of the AH rating. Especially AGM batteries can take more current and voltage than a similary sized flooded battery. But 5 AH, like the battery I have on my bike, is just small.

The original mechanical regulators had current limiting probably for just this reason, but modern solid state regulators, being designed for bikes with starter motors and big batteries, don't have current limiting (to my knowledge). So keep this in mind with regard to the battery you choose and the longevity you may expect from it.

Cotten
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Re: 1959 charging system:necessary to polarize

#6

Post by Cotten » Sun Oct 23, 2005 2:17 am

Cycle Electric makes proper solid state units for both 6 and 12v applications where the battery is mounted in a hot oil tank (requiring lower charging voltage).

But if you are going to keep the original generator, then wouldn't it follow suit to use the original-design mechanical regulator?

Back to the original question: yes, polarize after any discontinuity anywhere in the charging circuit, no matter what regulator you choose.

58flh
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Re: 1959 charging system

#7

Post by 58flh » Thu Aug 11, 2011 12:43 pm

Yes always polarize a genny no matter what kind of regulator is used! AMEN Cotton spelled it right out for us. When I Polarize my Genny-- I go right from the +side of my battery ,to the A terminal on the genny. Some choose to take it from the B terminal on the regulator to the A on genny---- nothing wrong with this, I just automatically assume saib regulator is bad (sealed electronic type)-thats why I go right to the source! Afterall we wouldnt be doing it if there wasent a problem! I have always had good-luck with charging systems on pans,shovels,flatties,& whatever ran on a genny! I used a good genny /w a Bosh regulator, or a Delco-Remy regulator. Most of the machines are kick-start olny! & believe me it makes a difference. Your not worried about CCA (cranking amps) for electric-start. When I set one of these machines up,I make sure -NEW REG.,I personaly rebuild the genny myself,NEW Batt.---After starting I check for voltage going back to Battery. At 2000 RPM if its not 14.5 or better ,with lights-on, That is when I set-up the points in the reg. until I achieve this number! It has served me well over the yrs. as a general rule of thumb. Ofcourse I do all the other checks before I adj. the regulator! Start with Battery 1st.,if good --genny 2nd. & all wires for connections. I only adj. the reg. as a last resort! Regulators are preset & tested at factory--these tests are for textbook stock set-ups. When a customer has enough lights on his dresser to run the Statue of Liberty, then you have to modify output.---Good-Luck & blueskys 58flh

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