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Chain Brands

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51Hog
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Chain Brands

#1

Post by 51Hog » Tue May 27, 2008 10:42 pm

Which chain brands do you prefer for the primary?----The Rear Chain? And Why?
I would really like to find one that runs evenly instead of the tight/loose/tight syndrome.



Cotten
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#2

Post by Cotten » Wed May 28, 2008 12:35 am

51Hog!

If a fresh chain turns "loose and tight", its a sprocket problem.


.....Cotten

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#3

Post by 51Hog » Wed May 28, 2008 4:07 am

Thanks Cotten,
I changed clutch hub and all sprockets.
If I adjust either chain so that there is 1/4" deflection at the tightest spot,
The loosest spot has 3/4" - 1" deflection. I do not think that the tight spots are relative to each other on the two chains like they would be with a bent tranny main shaft.
Is it a normal thing to get bad sprockets?
I checked the crank and the main-shaft after the rebuild. Both were very close. The rear axle started out at the front of the slot.
after 4000 miles, the rear axle is adjusted as far back as it will go without removing links.

The no-name chains that I am using are shot. I can feel the side to side slop in them without even removing them from the sprockets.

How many miles should the chains last?

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#4

Post by FlatHeadSix » Wed May 28, 2008 4:16 am

Chain "brand" doesn't mean much anymore. Its kind of like the Sifton brand name, the label really doesn't define the quality or the source of the product. A chain in a Diamond box could come from anywhere.

If there is a single reliable source for quality chains for vintage bikes I would sure like to know about it.

mike

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#5

Post by Revette » Wed May 28, 2008 11:46 am

51Hog wrote:Thanks Cotten,
The rear axle started out at the front of the slot.
after 4000 miles, the rear axle is adjusted as far back as it will go without removing links.

The no-name chains that I am using are shot. I can feel the side to side slop in them without even removing them from the sprockets.

How many miles should the chains last?
For primary chains I've always stuck with Diamond, and for secondary chains I started using Tsubaki around 25 years ago. I've been very satisfied with both. The Tsubaki oring chain on my old shovel has probably got around 12,000 miles on it with no problems.

4000 miles and no adjustment left sounds like you've been buying some real low-buck chain.

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#6

Post by Cotten » Wed May 28, 2008 3:18 pm

There are certainly different grades of chain, but I hope you are all using something intended for motorcycles. I tried cheap as dirt farm-store agricultural stuff once that got me all of 500 miles with a hack.

Any new length of chain should not have such variation. To inspect whether it is the chain or sprockets, turn it to it's tightest and mark the chain and sprockets with a grease pencil or crayon. Turn it through and watch to see if you can make any sense of it. It may take many many revolutions for a chain stretch to 'resolve', so count the turns.
You might want to count the links while you are at it. I've whacked a link off of many o' folks' chains that were fine after a scrub.

Beyond that, remember that looser is better than tighter in the long run.

.....Cotten

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#7

Post by keiser » Wed May 28, 2008 9:14 pm

I always use Tsubaki chains. I have tried others but the Tsubaki seem to last the longest on drive chains. Their chains are pre-stretched and don't seem to need any adjustment after running a few hundred miles.

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#8

Post by 51Hog » Fri May 30, 2008 5:25 pm

Is there enough room on the pan in stock configuration to run a Tsubaki O-ring chain on the rear? Sounds like that may be the way to go.
And, a Dimond primary. I need to buy chains today. I took a link out of the rear chain yesterday. There is more than 2" side flex in less than 12".
A bit worn I would say----

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#9

Post by Panacea » Sat May 31, 2008 2:23 am

I set my rear chain at 3/4" at the tightest spot, that leaves me with about 1 1/2 at the loosest spot. If the chain starts clicking on the brake rod that means it's time to adjust, and that's with brand new sprockets and an "o-ring" chain that gets spray lubed with "o-ring" safe oil about every 100 miles.

VT

#10

Post by VT » Sat May 31, 2008 3:05 am

pan in stock configuration to run a Tsubaki O-ring chain on the rear?
You can use the Tsubaki O-ring on a tin primary Knuckle or Pan if you put the master link on the inside instead of the normal outside. If you don't reverse the master link it will scrape on the inner primary. I like the Tsubaki non-0-ring rear chain. Seems to wear longer than the Diamond.

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#11

Post by 51Hog » Sat May 31, 2008 3:43 am

Panacea wrote:I set my rear chain at 3/4" at the tightest spot, that leaves me with about 1 1/2 at the loosest spot. If the chain starts clicking on the brake rod that means it's time to adjust, and that's with brand new sprockets and an "o-ring" chain that gets spray lubed with "o-ring" safe oil about every 100 miles.
When my chain gets more than 1" slop in it, when I let off the throttle, the slack in the chain goes to the top, and hits the clutch crossover lever. It is about 30% cut now. Maybe it is because I have a 24 tooth sprocket on the tranny.

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#12

Post by 51Hog » Thu Jun 12, 2008 9:17 pm

Cotten wrote:51Hog!

If a fresh chain turns "loose and tight", its a sprocket problem.


.....Cotten
On the money again Cotten....
New tsubaki non o-ring chain.
Tight loose syndrome still there.
Almost positive it is the rear sprocket now.
I marked the sprocket and chain, slowly turn the rear wheel, always tight when the mark on the rear sprocket is in the same location, regardless of where the mark on the chain is. That will teach me to rivet a little more carefully......
On a side note, I had to put the clip for the masterlink on the wheel side of the chain. When on the outside, it was hitting the back side of the primary case.

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#13

Post by Pantony » Tue Jun 17, 2008 2:12 pm

51Hog try putting an indicator and a mag base on the bike somewhere and see if you have any run out

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#14

Post by 51Hog » Tue Jun 17, 2008 4:14 pm

The rear sprocket is not round. Now that I think of it When I put it on, I did not rivet it correctly. Should have done it like torquing a wheel.
12:00 - 6:00 - 3:00 - 9:00...etc...
I just went in sequence in a circle.

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#15

Post by Pantony » Tue Jun 17, 2008 4:45 pm

ah HA! ya that'll do it

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